11 Best Books About Kids’ Nutrition & Healthy Eating

11 Best Books About Kids’ Nutrition & Healthy Eating

You don’t need to be a pediatrician or a nutritionist to raise kids who eat healthy but like all things when it comes to parenting, getting more information, advice and support makes the job a little easier.

This list of kids’ nutrition books include information about healthy eating, picky eating advice, and how to navigate issues like food allergies, sensory problems and food industry marketing.

I selected these books because they have high ratings, are written by leading kids’ nutrition experts or because I’ve enjoyed reading some of them myself.

Happy reading!

1. Adventures in Veggieland: Help Your Kids Learn to Love Vegetables―with 100 Easy Activities and Recipes, by Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP.

2. Raising a Healthy, Happy Eater: A Parent’s Handbook: A Stage-by-Stage Guide to Setting Your Child on the Path to Adventurous Eating, by Nimali Fernando, MD, MPH and Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP.

3. Helping Your Child with Extreme Picky Eating: A Step-by-Step Guide for Overcoming Selective Eating, Food Aversion, and Feeding Disorders, by Katja Rowell, MD, and Jenny McGlothlin, MS, CCC-SLP.

4. It’s Not About the Broccoli: Three Habits to Teach Your Kids for a Lifetime of Healthy Eating, by Dina Rose, PhD.

5. The Pediatrician’s Guide to Feeding Babies and Toddlers: Practical Answers To Your Questions on Nutrition, Starting Solids, Allergies, Picky Eating, and More (For Parents, By Parents), by Anthony Porto, MD, MPH and Dina DiMaggio, MD.

6. Fearless Feeding: How to Raise Healthy Eaters From High Chair to High School, by Jill Castle, MS, RDN and Maryann Jacobsen, MS, RD.

7. Try New Food: How to Help Picky Eaters Taste, Eat & Like New Foods by Jill Castle, RDN

8. Born to Eat: Whole, Healthy Foods From Baby’s First Bite by Leslie Schilling, MA, RDN and Wendy Jo Peterson, MS, RDN

9. The Clean-Eating Kid: Grocery Store Food Swaps for an Anti-Inflammatory Diet by Jenny Carr.

10. Kid Food: The Challenge of Feeding Children in a Highly Processed World, by Bettina Elias Siegel. 

11. Cure Your Child With Food: The Hidden Connection Between Nutrition and Childhood Ailments, by Kelly Dorfman, MS, LDN

What books about kids’ nutrition and healthy eating have you found to be helpful? Let me know in the comments.

5 Reasons Strawberries Are Healthy For Kids  The quintessential summer time fruit most kids love are super-healthy too.

5 Reasons Strawberries Are Healthy For Kids

The quintessential summer time fruit most kids love are super-healthy too.

There’s nothing better than the taste of fresh, sweet, succulent strawberries—the quintessential summer time fruit that most kids love.

In fact, 94 percent of U.S. households eat strawberries—nearly 5 pounds a year!

And 53 percent of young kids say strawberries are their favorite type of fruit.

The spring and summer months are prime time for picking strawberries, which is not only fun to do with your kids, but it can put an end to picky eating.

When it comes to choosing strawberries, organic is best since the Environmental Working Group (EWG)’s ranks them #1 on their Dirty Dozen list of fruits and vegetables highest in pesticides.

If organic isn’t within your budget however, the benefits of eating conventionally grown strawberries still outweigh the risks.

Here are 5 reasons strawberries are healthy for kids.

 

1. Strawberries are loaded with nutrition

 

Strawberries are one of the best superfoods you can feed your kids.

One cup of strawberries have nearly 150 percent of the daily value of vitamin C.

Strawberries are high in fiber and manganese, and a good source of potassium, calcium and magnesium.

Strawberries are also rich in antioxidants that have been shown to ward off certain types of cancer.

Studies show eating strawberries may reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke and hypertension.

 

 

2. Strawberries can prevent and treat constipation

Constipation is a common problems for kids. In fact, nearly 5 percent of pediatrician visits are because of constipation, according to a report in the Journal of Pediatric Health Care.

With 3 grams of fiber in every cup and a high water content, eating strawberries can help prevent constipation and get things moving again.

3. Strawberries might prevent type-2 diabetes

Rates of type-2 diabetes are on the rise in kids— a result in part, due to childhood obesity and diets high in processed foods.

Between 2008 and 2009, more than 5,000 kids were diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. Plus, and April 2017 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed the rate of newly diagnosed cases of type-2 diabetes in children between ages 10 and 19 increased by 4.8 percent.

Although kids should eat a wide variety of fruits to get the most nutrition, strawberries are healthy for kids because they have a low glycemic load—a measurement of a food’s impact on blood sugar.

In fact, a small study published in  February 2016 in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research found eating strawberries may improve insulin resistance and prevent type-2 diabetes.

4. Strawberries support healthy eyes

Strawberries are one of the best foods to support kids’ eye health.

Vitamin C is necessary for proper eye function and their antioxidants may prevent cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.

These are not concerns when kids are young of course, but teaching kids healthy eating habits now will set the stage for healthy eating in the future.

5. Strawberries encourage healthy eating

Kids love their sweets but before you dish out candy, cake or cookies, try serving strawberries.

Strawberries can satisfy a sweet tooth and make for a healthy, delicious swap for a high-sugar dessert, even if your kids refuse to eat dinner.

What’s more, if you can add strawberries to the list of foods your kid will eat, he may be more likely to try and love other new fruits too.

Do your kids love strawberries? What are your favorite ways to serve them? Let me know in the comments.

[VIDEO] 5 Spring Activities That Will End Picky Eating

[VIDEO] 5 Spring Activities That Will End Picky Eating

When you have kids who are picky eaters, it can take months—even years—

to get them to try a bite of new, healthy foods.

You do your best to offer fruits and vegetables, try new recipes, different cooking methods or add butter or cheese to make them more appealing but nothing seems to work.

Picky eating is really frustrating and if you’re ready to throw in the towel, you’re not the only one.

According to a 2018 survey out of the U.K., half of moms and dads have given up persuading their kids to eat 5 fruits and vegetables a day.

Take heed—and stick with it.

With spring time in full swing, there is perhaps no better time of year to offer all the healthy superfoods the season has to offer and take advantage of fun activities that can get your kids out of their picky eating behaviors for good. Here are 5.

Short on time? Get 3 tips in this quick video.

1. Berry picking

Although my kids eat just about anything, they have fallen into picky eating patterns in the past.

Last year for example, the only types of fruits my older daughter would eat were bananas, mangos, watermelon and cantaloupe.

As a toddler, she used to eat berries by the handful but now it had become impossible.

It doesn’t sound like a big deal—she was eating fruit after all—but berries are high in fiber, a great source of antioxidants and low glycemic, so they don’t have as high of an impact on blood sugar as the types of fruits she was eating.

Kids have their own food preferences of course, so I didn’t push the issue. But my gut feeling was that it was a phase.

Everything changed when we visited my mother-in-law in Delaware and made an impromptu trip to a blueberry orchard.

Maybe it was the experience of berry picking (likely) or that her Italian grandmother, who can get her to eat just about anything, was there (even more likely).

But within seconds, my daughter was saying: “I love blueberries!” and “blueberries are delicious!”

As we continued to pick the blueberries, I shook my head. I couldn’t believe how one new experience could literally change her perspective in seconds flat.

One of my Instagram followers had a similar experience:

“… this is how I got my daughter [to] eat more fruit. We go pick fruit all the time! She loves it and most of the time more goes in her tummy than in the bucket.”

May is the season to pick strawberries, but keep up the fun throughout the summer by picking blueberries, peaches, nectarines and cherries as well.

2. Farmers’ market

Visiting your local farmers’ market is a spring activity that can put an end to picky eating.

Kids learn where food comes from and it’s a new way for them to be exposed to local fruits and vegetables.

Let your kids pick out something they’ve never tried before and prepare it together at home—it will make them feel empowered and more likely to eat it.    

3. Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)

A Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm allows you to purchase local, seasonal food directly from local farmers.

You purchase a “share,” usually a box of vegetables, but some CSAs also include other farm products like eggs and cheese, that you receive each week.

It may be a benefit or a drawback depending on how you look at it, but you’ll receive varieties of vegetables that you never tried or heard of before.

Some CSAs may also allow you to personalize your share and choose some of the produce that’s included.

If you’re not ready to commit to a CSA, then take a visit to a local farm. Many local farms host tours, cooking classes and special events that can encourage your kids to try new foods.

4. Plant a garden

Last year, our family planted our first vegetable garden and my kids were thrilled to pick and eat the salad, tomatoes, eggplant and peppers that we grew.

A family garden is one of the best ways to encourage healthy eating. In fact, a September 2016 study out of the University of Florida suggests kids who garden are more likely to eat fruits and vegetables throughout their lives.

When kids learn how to grow their own food, they get really excited to see the fruits—and vegetables—of their labor and their perspectives can change overnight.

If you don’t have space for a garden, use small potted plants, grow herbs, sprouts or microgreens, or look for community gardens where you can plant your own food.

5. Have a picnic

Sometimes all it takes to get your kids out of their picky eating behaviors is a change of scenery.

Take advantage of the warmer weather and longer days and head out to the park, picnic grounds or even your own backyard for a picnic with your kids.

Pack foods you know they’ll eat in addition to some new, in-season foods, which they may be more likely to eat because eating outside is something different—and fun.

What are some of your favorite spring activities that have encouraged your kids to eat healthy? Let me know in the comments!

7 Kid-Friendly Ways To Use Chia Seeds

7 Kid-Friendly Ways To Use Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are hands down the ultimate superfood of the last decade and a great way to get more plant-based foods in your kid’s diet.

Sure, they might be tiny, but they pack a ton of nutrition.

With more than 4 grams of protein and a whopping 10.6 grams of fiber in every ounce, chia seeds will satisfy your kid’s hunger. Plus, because they have a low glycemic index, they keep blood sugar levels steady.

Chia seeds are also a good source of calcium, and the highest plant source of omega-3 fatty acids, which studies show support cardiovascular health, lower inflammation, prevent chronic disease, and support brain health.

Although your kid may initially be turned off by what they look like, you won’t have to sell him on the taste, because they have a mild, nutty flavor.

The other great thing about chia seeds is they can be added to virtually any type of meal or snack. They should however, always be mixed into another food or liquid before consuming and small children should avoid eating them due to the risk of an obstruction in the esophagus.

If you’ve tried to serve them to your kids only to be met with resistance, or you’re looking for more kid-friendly ways to use chia seeds, here are 7 to try.

1. Chia seed pudding

Chia seed pudding is one of the most popular ways to serve them up and makes for a healthy after-school snack or dessert.

Since chia seeds absorb about 10 times their weight in liquid, when they’re mixed with a liquid like almond milk, they form a gel and become soft like tapioca pudding.

Chia seed pudding is also a great replacement for store-bought puddings which usually have a ton of artificial ingredients and are high in sugar.

You can add things like cacao or cocoa powder, honey or maple syrup, pure vanilla extract and cinnamon, and top the pudding with fresh or dried fruit.

2. Breads, muffins, pancakes and waffles

Chia seeds mix well with any of your favorite breakfast foods and baking recipes and can be used as a substitute for other types of seeds. Since I’m allergic to flax seeds, I use chia seeds in my favorite gluten-free bread recipe.

You can also use it as a substitute for whole eggs. To replace one egg, mix one tablespoon of  whole chia seeds with 3 tablespoons of water and let it sit for 5 minutes.

3. Toppings and mix-ins

Kids love a little something extra and special in their meals, and chia seeds easily lend themselves as a healthy topping on yogurt and apple sauce and incorporated into overnight oats or parfaits.

4. Smoothies

Breakfast smoothies can be a great, non-sneaky way to get your kids to eat vegetables and when you blend in some chia seeds, there’s plenty of protein and fiber to fuel your kid until lunch. You can add dry chia seeds or soak them beforehand, it’s only a matter of preference.

5. Ice Cream and popsicles

Making homemade ice cream or popsicles allows you to control the ingredients, the amount of sugar and it saves you money, especially during the summer months when kids eat a lot of cool treats.

Try this recipe for Chocolate Chia Ice Cream and this one for Fruity Chia Seed Coconut Popsicles.

6. Jam

Whether it’s a PB&J or toast for breakfast, most kids love jam, jelly or fruit preserves. But most store-bought versions are made with ingredients like high fructose corn syrup and are high sugar. 

With some chia seeds, fresh or frozen fruit and a bit of sweetener however, you can make your own. Try this recipe from Cookie + Kate.

7. Granola

With oats, nuts, and fruit, granola is often seen as a heathy food but most types of granola are high in sugar.

Instead, make your own homemade granola—try this easy recipe—and add chia seeds for even more protein, fiber and texture.

What are some of your favorite ways to use chia seeds? Let me know in the comments.

7 Best Kids’ Yogurt Brands

7 Best Kids’ Yogurt Brands

Disclaimer: Please note that some of the links in this blog post are affiliate links from Amazon Associates. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I recommend these products either because I use them or because companies that make them are trustworthy and useful.

Whether you’re serving it for breakfast, an after-school snack, or for dessert, yogurt can be a healthy food and one that your kids will love to eat.

Yogurt is high in protein, a great source of calcium, potassium, magnesium and vitamin B12, and rich in gut-friendly, immune-boosting probiotics.

In the U.S., the yogurt market is booming—worth an estimated $38.7 billion

so if it seems the options are endless, it’s not your imagination.

Between plain, Greek, Skyr, French and dairy-free, fruit-flavored and with sweet, crunchy mix-ins, trying to figure out how to choose a healthy kid’s yogurt can make your head spin.

Luckily, I’ve done the work for you and selected some of the best kids’ yogurt brands based on the amount of protein, sugar and ingredients. Here are 7.

 

 

1. Siggi’s Yogurt Tubes

Siggi’s 2% low-fat yogurt tubes top my list for best kids’ yogurt brands and makes for a perfect snack or addition in your kid’s lunch box.

A strained, non-fat traditional yogurt of Iceland known as Skyr, Siggi’s has a thick and creamy texture but it’s smoother than Greek yogurt.

High in protein—5 grams per serving—and low in sugar, Siggi’s is non-GMO, made with milk that doesn’t contain rbST, a growth hormone, and made with real fruit.

 

 

2. Happy Family Whole Milk Yogurt

 

 

If you’re looking for a healthy kids’ yogurt to pack for the park, a playdate or school, Happy Family’s Whole Milk Yogurt pouches are a great choice.

Made with organic, non-GMO ingredients, they have no added sugar, are sweetened with organic fruit and vegetable purees and some varieties have healthy extras like oats and chia seeds.

Each serving has 3 grams of protein and between 4 and 6 grams of sugar, depending on the flavor.

 

 

3. Lavva

 

 

If you’re looking for a dairy-free, high protein yogurt, Lavva is my new favorite brand.

Lavva is plant-based yogurt made with pili nuts, a type of tree nut that’s grown in Southeast Asia and is high in magnesium, and a good source of protein, calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, and monounsaturated healthy fats that kids need in their diets.

It’s also made with young plantains, coconut, cassava and real fruit, it has no added sugar, flavors or artificial ingredients and is available in 7 different flavors.

It’s also low in sugar—only 6 grams per serving.

What I like most about Lavva is that unlike almond milk and coconut milk yogurts, it has a much thicker, creamier texture and a more robust flavor.

One caveat: with 140 calories per serving, pay attention to portion sizes and take into consideration your kid’s age and if you’re serving it with lunch or as a snack, for example.

 

 

4. Stonyfield Organic Whole Milk Tubes Strawberry Beet Berry

 

 

An organic kids’ yogurt made with dairy from pasture-raised cows and non-GMO ingredients, Stonyfield Organic’s Whole Milk Tubes Strawberry Beet Berry is one of the better in the product line of yogurt tubes.

With just 50 calories per serving, there’s a decent amount of protein (2 grams), but what I like best is that it’s also low in sugar (5 grams).

 

 

5. Green Valley Creamery Organic Plain Lowfat Yogurt

 

 

A lactose-free yogurt, Green Valley Creamery’s Organic Plain Lowfat Yogurt has no sugar added, no artificial ingredients and no preservatives.

Each 90-calorie serving has 8 grams of protein and 8 grams of sugar. They also have a whole milk variety that’s also high in protein and low in sugar.

 

 

6. Dannon Oikos Greek Nonfat Yogurt

 

 

Greek yogurt is high in protein and Dannon’s Oikos Greek Nonfat Yogurt does not disappoint.

Each 80-calorie serving has a whopping 15 grams of protein and 6 grams of sugar.

The tangy flavor of Greek yogurt can be a hard sell for kids however, so try adding cinnamon, pure vanilla extract, fresh berries or even a hint of honey to sweeten it.

 

 

7. Dannon Danimals

 

With no artificial flavors, colors or preservatives, and non-GMO, Dannon’s Danimals non-fat yogurt can be a good option if kid-friendly characters are the draw that will get yours to eat yogurt.

With 4 grams of protein and 10 grams of sugar per serving, it’s not my first pick, but it’s not the worst yogurt brand either.

 

 

What are your favorite kids’ yogurts? Leave me a comment!