[VIDEO] Is Dried Fruit Healthy For Kids?

[VIDEO] Is Dried Fruit Healthy For Kids?

Getting your kids to eat their vegetables is usually a challenge, but when it comes to fruit, most babies, toddlers and big kids love it.

Fresh, whole fruit is ideal for kids: it has plenty of vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber and water which kids not only need to thrive, but promotes feelings of satiety and can prevent constipation.

For those times when fresh fruit isn’t available or convenient however, you may have wondered, is dried fruit healthy for kids? Does dried fruit have too much sugar? And are raisins are a healthy snack for kids?

Here are answers those questions and more.

Short on time? Check out my video.

Dried fruit health benefits

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the amount of whole fruit kids consume has increased 67 percent, but 60 percent of kids still aren’t eating enough. 

So whether you buy it in a bag, a box, or as part of your favorite trail mix, dried fruit can be healthy for kids and a way to increase the amount of servings they get each day.

Dried fruit contains more fiber and phenols, a type of antioxidant that’s protective against certain diseases, than fresh fruit per ounce, Anthony Komaroff, M.D. states in this article.

What’s more, dried fruit can provide significant proportions of the daily recommended intake of several micronutrients like folate.

However, certain types of dried fruit lose some of their nutrients like vitamins A, C, thiamine and folate—a result of the drying process.

Unlike other types of kids’ snacks, dried fruit contains no sodium, cholesterol or fat (except for coconut).

Adding dried fruit to a salad, veggies, or plain Greek yogurt for example, can make it taste better and encourage your kids to eat foods they wouldn’t have otherwise touched.

Dried fruit is healthy because it has natural sugars, right?

When it comes to sugar, most experts say that it’s the added sugars that we should be paying attention to.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), too much added sugar can increase a child’s risk for obesity, tooth decay, heart disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, type-2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends kids between 2 and 18 eat less than 25 grams, or 6 teaspoons, of added sugars a day.

As the new Nutrition Facts labels continue to be rolled out, it will be easier than ever to decipher the grams of natural and added sugars in a food.

Although some experts consider dried fruit healthy for kids because it has natural sugars, I’m not convinced.

Through my work as a health journalist, I’m of the mind that all sugar, whether it’s natural or added, has the same effect on the body and should be limited.

And some experts agree.

According to Dr. Mark Hyman, “…high fructose corn syrup is absolutely worse for you than the natural sugar found in berries and apples, but for the most part, sugar is sugar is sugar. It all wreaks havoc on your health.”

Another thing to consider is that some manufacturers add sugar to certain types of dried fruit like tart cranberries so that they’ll taste sweet.

Related: What is High-Fructose Corn Syrup?

The calories in dried fruit can add up quickly

When you compare the same serving size of fresh fruit to dried fruit, dried fruit has  more calories.

Counting calories isn’t something any kid should be doing, whether they’re overweight or not. But it’s important to keep in mind that since dried fruit is so sweet and snackable, it’s easy to go overboard.

Are raisins a healthy snack for kids?

Individual portions of raisins are a kid-favorite and can be a healthy addition to your kid’s diet.

One small box has nearly 2 grams of fiber and protein, and they’re also a good source of iron, potassium and magnesium, the “calming mineral.”

Yet keep in mind that raisins are also high in sugar— 25 grams worth—so stick with grapes when you can, which are lower in sugar and more filling thanks to the amount of water they contain.

What about yogurt-covered raisins?

Yogurt-covered raisins sound like a healthy option for kids, but take a look at what Sun-Maid Vanilla Yogurt Raisins are actually made with:

Yogurt flavored coating (sugar, hydrogenated palm kernel oil, nonfat milk  powder, yogurt powder (cultured whey and nonfat milk), whey powder, artificial color (titanium dioxide), soy lecithin—an emulsifier, and vanilla),tapioca dextrin, confectioners glaze).

When you consider the ingredients, it’s best to serve these as a treat—or not at all.

Tips for Buying & Serving Dried Fruit

The next time you give your kids dried fruit, keep these tips in mind.

  • Since certain types of fruit (whether they’re fresh or dried) make the Environmental Working Group’s Dirty Dozen list, consider purchasing organic dried fruit to avoid pesticide exposure.
  • Read labels carefully and look for products where dried fruit is the only ingredient.
  • When buying cranberries, choose those that are sweetened with fruit juice, not sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, or artificial sweeteners, Cynthia Sass, RD states in this article.
  • Avoid dried fruit with artificial preservatives like sulfur dioxide and other additives.
  • Think of dried fruit as an extra: add it in small quantities to unsalted nuts and seeds, oatmeal, healthy cookies or homemade bars, and to vegetable and grain dishes.
  • Keep portion sizes in mind: one cup of fresh fruit is equivalent to 1/4 of dried fruit. But keep in mind, kids’ portion sizes are typically smaller depending on their ages.

The bottom line: dried fruit can be healthy for kids, but it’s best consumed in moderation and in the right portions.

5 Reasons Not To Be A Short Order Cook  Being a short order cook makes meal times easier, but can create habits that are hard to break in the long run.

5 Reasons Not To Be A Short Order Cook

Being a short order cook makes meal times easier, but can create habits that are hard to break in the long run.

Although my kids eat just about anything I put on their plates today, when my younger daughter was a toddler—and a picky eater—I fell into the trap of being a short order cook.

If she didn’t eat the food I served, or didn’t eat what I thought was “enough,” there were times when I’d pull something different out of the refrigerator that I knew she would eat.

Although this short order cooking made my life a lot easier, I realized that if I made it a habit, it would be a tough one to break.

And more importantly, I wanted her to learn that what I served was the only option, and she could choose to eat it or not.

If you have toddlers or young children who are picky eaters or flat out refuse to eat, chances are, you’ve become a short order cook too.

Here, I’d like you to consider 5 reasons why you should nip it in the bud ASAP.

1. Your child misses out on opportunities to try new foods

The key to raising kids who are healthy and adventurous eaters is giving them plenty of opportunities to try new foods.

The reality is that we can’t expect our kids to instantly love broccoli or take to carrots on the first try.

In fact, studies show it can take serving small portions of the same food 15 to 20 times before kids will even take a bite.

Related: Feeding Toddlers: What, When and How Much To Feed 1- to 3-year-olds

If kids eat the same foods over and over again, they’ll never expand their preferences for new foods they may actually come to love.

2. Being a short order cook is too time consuming

Whether you’re a working mom, a stay-at-home mom, or somewhere in between, life is hectic and you’re exhausted after a long day.

Although short order cooking can make dinnertime less stressful, making one meal for the whole family and an additional meal for your picky eater takes more time—even if it is only opening a package of frozen chicken nuggets.

Something else to consider is that preparing a second meal for your child can also make your life stressful if you have to constantly make sure you have foods on hand that your kid will eat.

If you go to a family or friend’s house for dinner and they serve something you know your kid will refuse, you’ll have to pack foods for him which only reinforces the picky eating.

You start to believe, “my kid is a picky eater,” and will only eat a handful of foods, when in reality, you can’t expect any different when that’s all he’s being served in the first place.

3. Short order cooking creates power struggles

It’s normal for toddlers to be picky eaters and a part of that is their desire for control.

So if you continue to be a short order cook, your child learns that no matter what he wants, you’ll give in.

According to Ellyn Satter, an authority on eating and feeding, it’s the parent’s responsibility to decide the what, when and where of feeding, and the child’s responsibility to decide how much and whether to eat.

4. Short order cooking usually means less nutritious food

I think it’s safe to say that kids who eat separate meals from the rest of the family usually eat foods that aren’t the healthiest.

Boxed macaroni and cheese, kid-friendly frozen meals, pasta with butter, and processed snack foods are usually easy, go-to foods while fruits and vegetables rarely make their way on kids’ plates.

5. Kids may grow up to be picky eating adults

Perhaps one of the most compelling reasons not to be a short order cook is that you want to raise kids who will be healthy throughout their lives.

According to an article in the New York Times, 75 percent of adults who call themselves picky eaters say the behaviors started in childhood.

In the U.S., we’re facing sky-high rates of obesity, chronic health conditions like type-2 diabetes, heart disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NALFD), autoimmunity and depression and anxiety.

Not to mention, we have a nation of people who turn to food when they’re stressed, bored or frustrated instead of finding healthy, more effective ways to cope.

Teaching our kids how to eat healthy and have healthy eating habits is important because their lives depend on it now and well into the future.

How Not to Be a Short Order Cook

Offer choices

While scrambled eggs and toast is all you’ll be able to pull together for dinner certain nights, when you do cook meals, try to offer choices.

When kids feel that eating is in their control, they’ll be more likely to make healthy

choices—as long as those choices are offered.

Put out a cooked vegetable and a salad, serve one of your kid’s favorite foods along with a new food, or serve a type of fruit you know your kid will eat—even if he eats nothing else.

Eat meals together

Family dinners may not happen every night, but sitting down as a family to eat any meal can prevent short order cooking.

In fact, children who eat with their families at least 3 times a week are more likely to eat healthy foods, a 2011 meta-analysis published in the journal Pediatrics found.

Cook with your kids

When kids take part in cooking meals, they learn each step of the process and they feel empowered to eat healthy because they had a hand in making the meal.

Cooking with your kids provides another opportunity to expand their palates and try new flavors, tastes and textures.

Stay consistent

Teaching kids about healthy foods and healthy eating habits takes consistency—and plenty of patience—at every meal.

Kids who are picky eaters aren’t going to change their ways overnight—and we can’t expect them to.

It’s also important to realize that everyone has their own food preferences so he won’t love what’s being served all of the time.

Just like with anything else that you have rules about or teach your children, they may not like it but that’s the way it goes!

Did you used to be a short order cook? How were you able to put an end to it? 

10 Healthy 4th of July Snacks For Kids

10 Healthy 4th of July Snacks For Kids

The 4th of July is the quintessential American holiday filled with parades, fireworks and backyard barbecues. Whether you’re the one hosting or you’ll be a guest, hot dogs, burgers and corn on the cob are a sure-bet for kids, but you might want to also have some healthy 4th of July snacks on hand too.

These 10 healthy recipes are festive, super-easy to make, and will satisfy your kid’s hunger in between lawn games and fun in the pool. Bonus: there are gluten-free, nut-free and dairy-free options!

Related: [VIDEO] 10 Summer Healthy Eating Ideas For Kids

 

1. Fruit Sparklers

2. American Flag Vegetable Tray

2. Patriotic Yogurt Bites

3. Kid-Friendly Avocado Hummus Cups

3. Red, White and Blue Popsicles

4. Gluten-Free Berry Fruit Pizza

5. Zucchini Parmesan Fries

6. Melon Prosciutto Mozzarella Skewers

7. American Flag Cheese Plate

8. Blueberry, Strawberry & Jicama Salsa

9. Caprese Salad Skewers

10. Popcorn with dried blueberries and cranberries

Should you raise your child vegetarian?

Should you raise your child vegetarian?

In the last few years, I’ve been an on-again, off-again vegetarian.

I believe that a healthy vegetarian diet can be a great plan to follow but after having chronic anemia and not being able to correct it through diet alone, I now eat meat along with a ton of plant-based foods and as a result, my kids eat the same way.

If you’ve considered whether or not you should raise your child vegetarian, you may have wondered if a vegetarian diet is healthy for kids and what types of foods they should eat.

Read on to learn if a vegetarian diet is healthy for kids and what you should consider before deciding to raise your child vegetarian.

Vegetarian kids on the rise

In recent years, there has been a lot of attention paid to plant-based, vegetarian and vegan diets, with plenty of health websites, bloggers, and celebrities touting the health benefits.

Still, the amount of people who actually call themselves vegetarian or vegan is slim.

According to a 2018 Gallup poll, 5 percent of adults identify as vegetarian while 3 percent say they’re vegan.

And a 2014 national poll by the Vegetarian Resource Group found that 4 percent of kids 8 to 18 are vegetarian or vegan, up from 3 percent in 2010

While some parents decide to raise their kids as vegetarian because they follow the plan themselves or simply because they want to eat healthier, some kids also decide to do so on their own.

In fact, teen girls, in particular, may start the diet because it’s trendy.

“Food is the one thing kids at this age can control. Sometimes wanting to be a vegetarian is a phase that passes for some children, while others are more committed to it,” Tara Todd, a registered dietitian at St. Louis Children’s Hospital stated in this article.

Are vegetarian diets for kids healthy?

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics position statement, vegetarian and vegan diets that are appropriately planned are healthy and provide adequate nutrition, have health benefits that prevent and treat certain diseases and

are appropriate for infants, children and teens.

Studies show that vegetarian and vegan diets can prevent type-2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and certain types of cancer.

The Academy says vegetarian kids are less likely to become overweight and obese, and tend to eat more fruits and vegetables and less sweets, salty snacks, and saturated fats than their meat-eating peers.

Research also shows that following a vegetarian diet early on in life can help to establish lifelong healthy, eating habits. 

Vegan diet for kids: the recent controversy

In May 2019, Belgian doctors from the Royal Academy of Medicine warned children, teens, and pregnant and breastfeeding moms to avoid vegan diets.

According to the position statement, they say veganism is “restrictive,” creates “unavoidable” nutritional shortcomings and, if not properly monitored, could lead to deficiencies and stunted development, this article states.

They even went so far as to say raising kids vegan is unethical because of the lack of animal protein and amino acids and called for parents who do so to be prosecuted, after deaths in schools, nurseries and hospitals.

In response, U.S. doctors from the Physicians Committee criticized the report saying it isn’t based on scientific evidence and could deter people from following a plant-based diet that can improve their health. They also said studies show people following a vegan diet get enough protein, iron and calcium.

What’s more, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says vegan diet for kids can be healthy and safe for infants and children, without lacking nutrition or affecting their growth.

What to consider before deciding to raise your child vegetarian

If you decide your kid will follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, there are certain nutrients you should focus on.

Protein

Although there are plenty of plant-based protein foods, because of differences in the amino acid composition and digestibility, children may need more protein, which may be between 15 and 35 percent depending on age.

Related: 9 Best Meatless Protein-Rich Foods For Kids (+Recipes!)

Iron

Iron is another nutrition kids who follow a vegetarian or vegan diet may become deficient in, so it’s important for your child’s pediatrician to test for iron deficiency.

Eating iron-rich foods such as beans, eggs, soybeans, and spinach with foods rich in vitamin C like peppers, tomatoes, and citrus fruits can increase absorption.

If your child still falls short, a supplement can help.

Zinc

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), vegetarians may need 50 percent or more of the recommended daily allowance for zinc than non-vegetarians.

To increase the bioavailability of zinc, they recommend vegetarians soak beans, grains, and seeds in water for several hours, and allow them to sit until sprouts form before cooking them.

Omega-3 fatty acids

Kids who are vegan or lacto-vegetarian and avoid fish could be missing out on omega-3 fatty acids, the healthy fats kids need.

As an alternative, kids will need to get plant-based sources of omega-3 fatty acids which include chia seeds, walnuts, flaxseeds and fortified foods like cereal.

Related: 7 Kid-Friendly Ways To Use Chia Seeds

Vitamin B12

Since beef and certain types of fish are excellent sources of vitamin B12, kids can become deficient.

Still, there are some great suitable sources of vitamin B12 such as tofu, tempeh, nutritional yeast, and fortified foods like non-dairy milk and cereal.

Calcium

Fortunately, if your child is avoiding dairy, you don’t have to worry that he isn’t getting enough calcium.

Green leafy vegetables, figs, sesame seeds, soymilk and fortified cereals are all great sources of calcium.

Related: 10 Calcium-Rich Foods For Kids That Aren’t Milk


Vegetarian doesn’t always mean healthy

 

If you decide to raise your child vegetarian or vegan, it’s important to make sure the diet is well-planned.

Just like gluten-free diets, it’s really easy to rely on too many processed, packaged junk foods and frozen foods, and grab-and-go grocery store or take-out meals that are often low in fiber and high in sodium and saturated fat.

Instead, focus on plenty of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, plant-based proteins like beans, legumes, and nuts and seeds, and healthy fats like olive oil and avocado.

Related: 25 Healthy Avocado Recipes for Kids

Since many vegetarian and vegan foods tend to be low in calories, it’s also important to make sure your kid is eating enough to support his growth and development.


Separate meals can mean more time in the kitchen

Another thing to consider is meal planning and cooking and the time it takes.

When I was vegetarian, it wasn’t easy to simply grab a protein and pop it in the oven.

I had to plan ahead and make large batches of lentils and bean burgers, for example, to make sure I always had something on hand.

If your child is vegetarian but you and your spouse aren’t for example, you could also find yourself making separate meals for everyone which can be time consuming.

Making meals in bulk, or cooking with your kids can help.


Get help from an expert

Kids’ diets can include a variety of fresh, whole foods but that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re getting everything they need.

If your child is a picky eater, that’s even more of a reason to pay attention to his diet.

You might consider speaking to a registered dietitian-nutritionist (RDN) who can take stock of what your kid is eating and where there might be nutritional deficiencies.

An RDN can also help with meal planning and recipes.

The bottom line: a vegetarian diet or vegan diet can be healthy for kids if it’s appropriately planned and kids actually eat the food.

Whether or not your child sticks with it or not, getting more plant-based foods in his diet is always a good idea.

Is your child vegetarian or vegan? What tips can you share for eating healthy?

5 Reasons You Should Bring Your Kids to the Farmers’ Market

5 Reasons You Should Bring Your Kids to the Farmers’ Market

Summer is all about soaking in the sunshine, dining al fresco and savoring the healthy superfoods the season has to offer.

Just like planting a garden or joining a community supported agriculture (CSA) farm, going to the farmers’ market is a great way to encourage healthy eating and get your kids out of their picky eating habits. 

Here are 5 reasons you should consider bringing your kids to a farmers’ market this summer.

1. Cool, new fruits and vegetables

With several types of green leafy vegetables, and foods like heirloom tomatoes, yellow and purple carrots, and donut peaches, the variety of fruits and vegetables at the farmers’ market is enough to spark your kid’s interest in healthy eating.

Let your kids pick out something new and then learn how to prepare and cook it together at home.

Related: 5 Surprising Benefits of Cooking With Your Kids

Most farmers’ markets also sell other products like eggs, cheese, local honey, grass-fed beef, herbs and flowers, breads and baked goods, and personal care products.

2. Get local and organic produce


Grocery stores sell organic produce, but since it’s picked weeks before it hits grocery store shelves, it’s not the freshest.

Unlike grocery stores, produce sold at the farmers’ market aren’t stored for long periods of time, treated with chemicals that extend their shelf life, or shipped long distances.

In fact, more than half of farmers travel less than 6 miles, according to a report by the USDA.

When you shop the famers’ market, you’re getting fruits and vegetables that are ripe, and picked and sold the same day.

As a result, they’re fresher and tastier than store-bought produce and more nutritious, Preston Andrews, PhD, a plant researcher stated in this article.

In addition, although not all famers sell organic produce, 47 percent do sell some type of organic products.

Although prices vary at farmers’ markets, you might get a better deal on organic produce than you would at the grocery store, one report found.

3. Kids get to meet the farmers

When you bring your kids to the farmers’ market, they have a unique opportunity to meet the farmers who grow the food.

Kids can learn about new varieties of produce from the farmer, learn how and where the food is grown, and for speciality vendors, how the products are made.

Meeting the local farmers is also a great opportunity to get personalized recommendations about how to prepare and cook foods and get recipes.

4. Encourages healthy eating

When you bring your child to the farmers’ market and let them pick out new fruits and vegetables, they feel empowered to make their own healthy eating choices.

In fact, a 2018 study found that when kids were given $15 to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables at a farmers’ market, their diets improved.

The kids were also more likely to shop at the famers’ market than those who didn’t receive the stipend.

5. Farmers’ markets are fun for kids

Select farmers’ markets across the country have implemented programs to teach kids about healthy eating and make their visits a fun experience.

Take the Power of Produce (POP) Club at the Oregon City Farmers Market.

There, kids get $2 every time they visit the farm to purchase their own fruits and vegetables, and they lean how to plant sunflower seeds, and make salads and jam, for example.

Some farmers’ markets also have cooking demonstrations and classes, entertainment, and other fun activities, for example.

Do you bring your kids to the farmers’ market? In what ways has it encouraged healthy eating?

25 Healthy Avocado Recipes for Kids

25 Healthy Avocado Recipes for Kids

Along with strawberries and cherries, avocado (it’ also a fruit!), is one of the healthiest and most delicious foods you can serve your kids.

Guacamole, avocado toast or added to green smoothies are some tried and true ways to serve them up.

But there are so many healthy avocado recipes that the options are endless.

My kids are big fans of avocado—whether it’s in a salad, mixed with sweet corn, tomato and red onion, and of course served with tortilla chips.

Here, learn a bit why avocados are healthy for kids, and get 20 healthy avocado recipes to try.

Avocados are a superfood for kids


Tons of vitamins and minerals

With 20 vitamins and minerals including vitamins B5, B6, C, E, K, folate and potassium, your kids will get a ton of nutrition without a lot of calories.

Avocados also contain lutein and zeaxanthin, which are carotenoids, or plant pigments found in the eyes that can improve memory and processing speed, one study found.

Eating avocado alongside nutrient-dense vegetables helps to improve the absorption of fat-soluble nutrients like vitamins A, D, K and E.

 


Healthy fats

 

Avocados are an excellent source of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, or the healthy fats that can help reduce bad cholesterol and the risk for heart disease later on in life.

 

The polyunsaturated fats found in avocado are also vital for brain growth and development during pregnancy, infancy and childhood.

 

  

 

Filling fiber

 

Avocado is a great source of fiber, which helps to satisfy kids’ hunger, help them feel fuller longer, prevent weight gain and cure constipation.

 


Related: How Much Fiber Do Kids Need?
 

 

 

 

25 Healthy Avocado Recipes for Kids

 

Mashed, blended, scooped or cut up into cubes, there are so many ways to serve avocado. 

 

Avocado makes a healthy first food for baby or as a substitute for mayonnaise, mustard or ketchup, or for butter in baked goods.

 

Here are some healthy and delicious ways to serve avocado.

 

 

Breakfast

 

 1. Butternut Squash Avocado Muffins

 

2. Tropical Avocado Breakfast Parfait

 

3. Avocado Toast

 

4. Avocado Pineapple Smoothie Bowl

 

5. Bacon and Eggs in a Mason Jar Topped with Avocado, Tomato and Basil

 


Lunch

 

6. California Grilled Chicken Avocado and Mango Salad

 

7. Chilled Avocado Soup

 

8. Avocado and Cheese Toasties

 

9. Avocado Egg Salad

 

10. Avocado and Cheese Roll-Ups

 


Dinner

 

11. Summer Corn, Tomato and Avocado Salad with Creamy Buttermilk-Dijon Dressing

 

12. Avocado Chicken Enchiladas

 

13. Avocado Cilantro Lime Rice

 

14. Tortilla Soup

 

15. Summer Goodness Millet Salad

 

16. Cucumber Tomato Avocado Salad

 

17. Avocado Pasta

 


Snacks and Desserts

 

 

18. The Easiest 4-Ingredient Guacamole

 

19. Avocado Fries With Lime Dipping Sauce

 

20. Avocado Chocolate Mousse

 

21. Vegan Brownies

 

22. Mint Chocolate Avocado Ice Cream

 

23. Creamy Avocado Lime Parfaits

 

24. Coconut Avocado Popsicles

 

25. Chocolate Avocado Pudding Pops

 

What are your favorite avocado recipes? Let me know in the comments!

 

6 Habits of Healthy Dads  Healthy dads put their health, themselves and their families first.

6 Habits of Healthy Dads

Healthy dads put their health, themselves and their families first.

Whether you’re a new dad or a seasoned pro, there’s no doubt you want to be the best dad ever.

But being a great father goes way beyond teaching your kid to ride a bike or throw a ball.

Happy, healthy dads make certain habits a priority in their lives so they can be great parents and spouses.

Here, learn 6 habits of healthy dads that can make you a better, stronger father.


1. Healthy dads see their doctors


According to a 2018 survey by the Cleveland Clinic, only 60 percent of men see their doctors for a yearly check-up.

Whether it’s because you don’t think your health is a huge concern or it’s something you don’t talk about—53 percent agree, the survey found—it’s important to re-think your old ways.

Studies show women live nearly 5 years longer than men, and avoiding their doctors is one of the reasons why.

An annual physical with your primary care doctor can prevent and identify early signs of conditions like heart disease, type-2 diabetes, and prostate cancer and ensure you’re getting the screenings you need.

Regularly visits can also help your doctor identify symptoms that may actually be signs of serious medical conditions. For example, snoring and high blood pressure are symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea, and erectile dysfunction can be a sign of type-2 diabetes or blocked arteries.

So make that appointment—and put an end to your wife’s nagging once and for all.


2. They don’t smoke


The amount of smokers have declined over the years, but more than 15 percent of men in the U.S. still smoke.

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease and death, and accounts for about 1 in 5 deaths every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),

Although you know secondhand smoke is unhealthy, thirdhand smoke has garnered a lot of attention in recent years because of its dangers, especially to kids.

Thirdhand smoke is the residue from smoking on the smoker’s clothes, hair, and car, as well as the carpet, furniture and walls of the smoker’s home. 

A January 2019 study in the journal Tobacco Insights found not smoking around kids doesn’t prevent them from being exposed to nicotine.

Not only do kids inhale the dangerous chemicals, but since they’re always putting their hands in their mouths, they’re ingesting it too.

Higher levels of exposure to thirdhand smoke may also be linked to respiratory problems like wheezing and coughing, the same study found.

Quitting smoking isn’t easy but there is support available. Check out resources from the CDC, SmokeFree.gov and the American Lung Association.


3. They do their best to eat healthy

 

 

Although you might think you’re a “big guy” or your beer belly is endearing, carrying extra lbs anywhere in your body could kill you.

More than 73 percent of men are overweight or obese in the U.S., according to the CDC.

Obesity is associated with an increased risk for heart disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, certain types of cancer and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an epidemic and silent killer.

Research shows men who aren’t considered overweight are at risk too.

A December 2015 study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found men who carry weight around their midsection, even if they’re slim in other areas of their body, have twice the mortality risk of men who are only overweight or obese.

Overhauling your diet isn’t going to happen overnight, especially if you’ve been eating that way for years.

But making changes and creating new, healthy habits can make a huge difference in your health.

Small changes might include bringing a healthy lunch to work instead of ordering in, put an end to snacking in front of the TV, or adding extra veggies to your meals.

Related: 8 Ways To Eat Healthy When Dad Doesn’t

 

4. They make exercise a priority

You might think the goal of your workout is only to get bigger and stronger, but exercise is vital to your physical, mental and emotional health too, something healthy dads already know.

Exercise can:

  • Prevent weight gain
  • Improve blood glucose levels
  • Lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels
  • Lower risk of heart disease
  • Improve your brain health
  • Strengthen your bones and muscles
  • Reduce the risk of certain types of cancer
  • Improve sleep
  • Boost mood and combat stress
  • Improve sexual function
  • Improve longevity

Of course, whether you have toddlers or big kids, staying in shape can also help you keep up with them.

Joining a gym is an obvious first start, but if it’s not your thing, there are so many ways to get in more physical activity.

Look for organized sports leagues, running or cycling groups, or sign up for a fitness app you can do in the privacy of your home.

 

5. Healthy dads find ways to cope with stress

The World Health Organization recently announced that burnout is a syndrome, linked to chronic work stress, and suffice to say, most men are at risk.

According to a survey by LinkedIn, 50 percent of men say work stress, workload and lack of work/life balance top the list of reasons.

High levels of chronic stress can also lead to anxiety and depression.

A September 2018 study in JAMA Pediatrics found more than 4 percent of fathers of young children screened positive for depression—almost as much as mothers (5 percent).

It’s important to address stress, because left unchecked, it will only get worse.

Make time for downtime, take up a new hobby, seek out a mentor or get a referral for a therapist.

If you also struggle with anxiety, depression, past trauma or addiction, there is help available.

Seek support through the National Alliance on Mental Health (NAMI), the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) or an organization like Celebration Recovery.

 

6. Healthy dads make time for their partners

 

 

Once the baby comes along, it’s easy for all romance, or any time for each other for that matter, to go out the window.

According to a 2011 study conducted by the American Psychological Association, 67 percent of couples say their marital satisfaction took a nosedive after having a baby.

Research shows this dissatisfaction can also increase the chances for children to have poor social skills, develop depression and behavioral problems.

Couples who make time for date nights, or carve out time for each other on a regular basis, have happier, healthier marriages.

The good news is that date nights don’t necessarily have to be dinner and movie.

A February 2019 study in the Journal Of Marriage and Family found painting or playing a board game may increase levels of oxytocin, “the love hormone,” even more.

6 Best Healthy Summer Eating Tips For Kids

6 Best Healthy Summer Eating Tips For Kids

 

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There’s an abundance of healthy super foods for kids during the summer, and while it may be a great opportunity to get your kids out of their picky eating habits and transform them into super-healthy kids, studies show summer may actually be the worst time of year to make that a reality.

According to a July 2015 study in the American Journal of Public Health, body mass index (BMI) for kindergarteners and first graders increased two to three times as fast during the summer than the school year.

More opportunities for grab-and-go foods at the pool, the boardwalk and the carnival, trips to the ice cream shop, longer, less structured days, and more time spent on devices are likely culprits.

If you plan ahead, make some simple swaps and use a few easy strategies however, your family can stay on track.

Here are 5 of my best healthy summer eating tips for kids.


1. Avoid sugary drinks


Long, hot summer days mean your kids will be drinking more fluids anyway, but what they drink is important.

According to a 2015 poll by the YMCA, about 75 percent of kids drink sugar-sweetened beverages at least weekly during the summer, and about 25 percent kids consume one or more sweetened beverages every day or almost every day.

Instead of soda, juice, sugar-sweetened beverages like lemonade, ice tea and sports drinks which are high in empty calories and sugar, spike blood sugar and may encourage cravings for other sugary fare, stick with plan H2O.

Since dehydration can often be mistaken for hunger—which is one of the reasons your kid is always hungry—it’s even more important that they make a point to drink plenty of water. 

Encourage your kids to drink water first thing in the morning, when they’re most likely to be dehydrated, sip throughout the day and before meals.

If water is too plain for them, add cut up cucumbers or strawberries for some flavor.


2. Take advantage of grilling season

 

When you grill up your hamburgers, chicken or fish, add zucchini, yellow squash, asparagus, onions and peppers which your kids may be more willing to eat because it’s simply a different way to serve them.

Or put out several types of vegetables and let them make their own vegetable kabobs to grill.

When kids have a hand in making a meal, they’ll be more likely to eat it.

You can also grill fruit like peaches, pineapples and melon which make for a  healthy dessert.


3. Stick to a schedule

If your kids aren’t in camp and there’s no set schedule to your days, there may also be less consistency when it comes to regular meals.

Your kids might skip meals, eat meals at different times each day and ask for snacks—all habits that can lead to overeating and weight gain.

Although vacations or day trips can definitely throw off your schedule, one of the best summer healthy eating tips is to do your best to have regular meal and snack times, make sure your kids eat a healthy breakfast, and try to prevent grazing and mindless snacking.


4. Use your cutting board


During the summer, kids eat more vegetables, but they still don’t eat enough, the same YMCA poll found.

Kids need 2 to 3 servings of vegetables each day, but the serving sizes vary by age.

Check out this chart from the American Academy of Pediatrics to see portion sizes for your kid.

Do your best to include vegetables at every meal and snack, which will give your kids the nutrition they need, help satisfy their hunger, prevent overeating, and cure constipation.

The good news is that you don’t have to turn on the oven or spend too much time preparing them.

Kids love bite-sized and finger foods, so cut up raw vegetables like celery, cucumbers, and bell peppers to add to meals or serve as a snack with a healthy dip.


5. Put healthy food at eye level

According to the 2010 White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity report, “children’s choices depend on what is most visible and easily accessible.”

So resist the urge to stock your pantry with chips, crackers and cookies and other types of fake food and put healthy food at eye level.

Spend 30 minutes or so on the weekend to wash and cut up fruits and vegetables and store them in clear glass containers front and center in the refrigerator.

Make individual portions of smoothie ingredients or set aside portions of nuts, seeds and dried fruit that are easy to grab, especially when you’re on the go.


6. Get kids in the kitchen

With more time to spend together, the summer is an ideal time to get kids in the kitchen, which encourages them to eat healthy because they feel empowered to do so.

Read: 5 Surprising Benefits of Cooking With Kid

Get your kids a set of kid-friendly knives and a chopping board and show them how to wash, prep and chop fruits and veggies.

Or make a salad together using my favorite chopping bowl.

If you’re not the greatest home chef or could simply use some pointers, I recommend you take my friend Katie Kimball’s Kids Cook Real Food online video eCourse. Check out her video: 

15 Best and Worst Summer Foods For Kids

15 Best and Worst Summer Foods For Kids

School is almost out and with summer right around the corner, there will be plenty of time to enjoy backyard barbecues, lazy days at the pool, trips to the amusement park and family getaways.  

Of course, of all the places you’ll go, there will also be plenty of healthy, delicious superfoods and some foods that are high in sugar, unhealthy saturated fats and artificial ingredients. 

Here are 15 summer foods that can be served up regularly along with those that are better in moderation, or avoided altogether. 

Best Summer Foods 

1. Watermelon

With its juicy, refreshing and subtle sweetness, watermelon is a kid favorite and one of the best summer foods. 

As its name implies, 90 percent of watermelon is water, which is a great food to keep kids hydrated on hot, summer days and prevent constipation.

It’s also a good source of vitamin C, iron, calcium and lycopene, a carotenoid or antioxidant. Studies show lycopene may reduce exercise-induced asthma and lower the risk of heart disease and prostate cancer. 

2. Zucchini and Squash

Zucchini and yellow squash are rich in fiber, potassium, vitamins A, C, and E, B vitamins and magnesium, the “calming mineral.”

Squash is also rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoids or plant pigments found in the eyes that can improve memory and processing speed, one study found.

3. Cherries


Cherries are a nutritional powerhouse and one of the best summer for kids.

Cherries are an excellent source of potassium, a mineral that helps to regulate fluid levels in the body and counteracts the effects of sodium—a good thing if your kids are filling up on salty fare this summer.

They also contain quercetin, a plant pigment and an antioxidant that helps balance blood pressure. 

Since cherries are also a natural source of melatonin, the “sleep hormone,” they can help kids have an easier time falling asleep, which can be challenging during the summer months when the sun sets later and kids are often wound up from the busy days.

Read: 6 Reasons Cherries Are Healthy for Kids + Recipes

4. Swiss Chard


All green leafy vegetables are superfoods for kids, but Swiss chard, which is in season during the summer, has a mild taste, making it more likely that your child will eat it.

Swiss chard is high in vitamins A,C, E, and K, B6 and folate, calcium, iron, magnesium and potassium. 

5. Kiwi fruit


Kiwi fruit is an excellent source of fiber—a 1/2 cup has 3 grams—and a good source of vitamins C, E, and K, and potassium. Sweet and delicious, it also makes for a great first food for baby.

Read: How To Make Baby Food—Fast


6. Shrimp


Shrimp is one of best summer foods for kids.

It’s an excellent source of protein— a 3-ounce serving of shrimp contains a whopping 18 grams. It’s also a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, iron,  vitamin B12 and selenium.

Serve shrimp cocktail as an appetizer or grill it for dinner, shrimp is a quick, easy and versatile.

7. Corn on the cob

It’s not summer without corn on the cob, and fortunately, it’s a kid-favorite and can be healthy without tons of butter and salt.

One ear of corn has nearly 2 grams of fiber and protein and is a good source of folate, vitamins A, B6 and C, magnesium, thiamin, lutein and zeaxanthin.

Boil or grill corn on the cob and if you’re going to add butter, stick with grass-fed butter because it contains gut-friendly probiotics.

 

8. Strawberries


Strawberries are high in fiber, rich in antioxidants and a good source of vitamin C, potassium, calcium and magnesium.

Strawberries can also satisfy a sweet tooth and make for a healthy, delicious swap for a high-sugar dessert.

Read: 5 Reasons Strawberries Are Healthy For Kids

Worst Summer Foods


1. Fried dough


Whether it’s an amusement park, a carnival or fair, chances are, you’ll be able to get fried dough, zeppole (my favorite), or funnel cake.

Flour, sugar and deep fried: what’s not to love?

But fried foods contain trans fat, which raises both LDL (bad) cholesterol and lowers  HDL (good) cholesterol and is linked to an increased risk for heart disease, stroke and type-2 diabetes, a condition that’s on the rise in kids.

Sure, a plate full of funnel cake might not sound like a big deal, but let your kid eat the whole thing and it can net more than 700 calories.

Also, take into account other foods that may have trans fat your kids might be eating throughout the summer: doughnuts, French fries, bakery goods, pizza, chips, cookies and crackers.

2. Hot dogs

 

Hot dogs at a picnic or summer party are synonymous with childhood, but hot dogs are hands down one of the worst summer foods for kids.

Hot dogs are processed, contain nitrates and are high in saturated fat.

Take a look at how hot dogs are really made, and you’ll probably swear them off forever.

Even worse? A corn dog, which is high in saturated fat and sodium.

 

3. Macaroni salad

 

A staple at summer barbecues, macaroni salad is creamy and delicious thanks to ingredients like mayonnaise, sugar and cheese.

Yet with 300 calories per serving, along with 19 grams of fat, 8 grams of sugar and nearly 800 milligrams of sodium, it’s one summer side dish that’s best to avoid.


4. Popsicles

 

Fruit popsicles are a summertime kid-favorite but many store-bought brands are made with high-fructose corn syrup, artificial food dyes and are high in sugar.

Take the Popsicle brand fruit pops which are made with real fruit: 34 grams of sugar, 31 of which are added sugars!

When buying popsicles, read labels carefully. Even better? Make your own. Here are some great recipes from Super Healthy Kids.


5. Cole slaw


Sure, cabbage is a healthy, green leafy vegetable but smother it in mayonnaise and you’ve got a calorie-dense, fat-laden side dish.

A half cup of cole slaw has 230 calories, 23 grams of fat, and 6 grams of sugar. 

If you still want to serve it, cut back on the amount of mayo, nix the sugar or swap in Greek yogurt. Or serve up grilled vegetables or a green salad instead.


6. Snow cones

A favorite along the boardwalk and at carnivals, snow cones are not only made with high-fructose corn syrup and are high in sugar (25 grams per serving), but they contain artificial food dyes, sweeteners and preservatives, and ingredients like propylene glycol, the same toxic chemical used in anti-freeze.

7. Cotton candy

The quintessential carnival fare, cotton candy is melt-in-your-mouth goodness but it is perhaps one of the worst summer foods you can feed your kids.

Loaded with sugar— 56 grams of sugar per serving—and artificial flavors and food dyes, it’s one food to avoid, or at the very least share among the family.

6 Reasons Cherries Are Healthy For Kids + Recipes!

6 Reasons Cherries Are Healthy For Kids + Recipes!

Cherries are one of the most healthy and delicious fruits during the spring and summer months and a favorite in U.S. households: people consume more than 2 pounds of cherries each year.

Whether you add them to a lunch box, serve them as a snack or dish them up as an after-dinner treat, chances are, they’ll be a hit with your kids.

Not only do kids love to eat bite-sized foods, but they also get to be in control and feel empowered to choose how much they want to eat, which may encourage them to make healthy choices at other times of the day too.

It goes without saying however, that if you have little ones, be sure to pit the cherries to prevent choking. Since they have a tough texture, it may also be a good idea to puree them if you’re serving them to an infant.

Read on to discover 5 reasons why cherries are healthy for kids, plus some healthy and delicious recipes.

1. Rich in antioxidants

Cherries are high in polyphenols and vitamin C, which have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties.

Vitamin C in particular, is important for skin, bones and connective tissue, promotes healing, helps the body to absorb iron and helps in the formation of neurotransmitters, or the body’s chemical messengers.

2. Supports brain health

Cherries are also rich in anthocyanin, an antioxidant that provides their rich red pigment.

Anthocyanin is also known to support cognitive and motor function and improve visual and neurological health.

Studies in mice suggest consuming cherries also supports brain health, improves memory, and prevents Alzheimer’s disease.

3. High in fiber

Since most kids don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, they’re falling short on fiber which is necessary to satiate hunger, keep blood sugar levels steady and prevent constipation.

Studies also show eating plenty of fiber lowers the risk for heart disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer.

In fact, a January 2019 review in The Lancet found compared to people who ate less fiber, those who ate more fiber had a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, colon cancer and a risk of dying early from any cause, by 15 to 30 percent.

With more than 3 grams of fiber in one cup, cherries will help kids get the fiber they need.

4. May prevent type-2 diabetes

Cherries have a low glycemic load so they don’t spike blood sugar and insulin levels, which may prevent type-2 diabetes, a condition that’s on the rise among kids

5. Heart-healthy

Although the research is still unclear, some studies suggest drinking tart cherry juice or consuming cherries may lower levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure—all risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

In fact, a small June 2019 study published in the Journal of Functional Foods found consuming the juice of Montmorency cherries reduced insulin levels and blood pressure.

Although heart disease isn’t something to be concerned about when your child is young, what they eat today can set the stage for their diet—and their health—well into the future. 

6. May make bedtime easier

If you have little ones, bedtime is one of the most dreaded times of the day to begin with.

But older children may get less sleep than they need because of electronics use, evening activities, homework, and a lack of sleep rules such as a sticking with a consistent bedtime, for example. 

Instead of turning to a melatonin supplement, which experts say is a concern for kids, eating a handful of cherries may help.

In fact, a December 2012 study in the European Journal of Nutrition suggests consuming tart cherry juice can improve the duration and quality of sleep.

That’s because cherries are the only natural source of melatonin, Rania Batayneh, MPH, a nutritionist and best-selling author said in this article.

Melatonin, known as the sleep hormone, regulates the body’s sleep-wake cycles.

Healthy Cherry Recipes

Here are some of my favorite healthy cherry recipes to try.

Brown Butter Cherry Bars by Tutti Dolci

Fresh Cherry Sauce by The Brewer & The Baker

Cherry Almond Smoothie by Hungry Girl For Vida

Super Detox Salad by Well Plated

Cherry Chocolate Hazelnut Muffins by Hip Foodie Mom

Cherry Pomegranate Limeade Popsicles by Chef Savvy

Do your kids eat cherries? How do you serve them? Let me know in the comments.

7 Healthy Memorial Day BBQ Ideas

7 Healthy Memorial Day BBQ Ideas

The Memorial Day BBQ is the unofficial start to the summer and whether you’ll be hosting or visiting family and friends, there will be plenty of food.

Yet between hot dogs and hamburgers, potato salad, coleslaw, chips and dip and your favorite red-white-and-blue dessert, Memorial Day is also one of the most caloric, high-sugar, fat-laden holidays of the year.

While I encourage my kids to try new foods and indulge on any holiday, I also worry that they’ll overeat, which in the past, have caused them to become physically ill.

Not only that, but I want to teach them healthy eating habits and how to enjoy food without going overboard.

Fortunately, you don’t have to sacrifice taste, forego your favorite summertime dishes or have “food rules” to strike a balance. Here are 7 healthy Memorial Day BBQ ideas that will allow your family to enjoy without getting too far off track.

Stay hydrated

Chances are Memorial Day will be a warm, sunny day and your kids will be running around so it’s important to encourage them to drink plenty of water.

Encourage your kid to stick with water throughout the day, instead of juice which is high in empty calories and sugar, spikes blood sugar, and may encourage cravings for other sugary fare.

If plain water is hard for your kids to swallow however, add sliced cucumbers or strawberries for some flavor. See also: How to Get Your Kids To Drink More Water

Since thirst can often be mistaken for hunger, drinking water before you arrive to your cookout can prevent overeating.

2. Offer veggies


The great thing about the vegetables served at Memorial Day BBQs is that they’re often kid-friendly.

Baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, brightly-colored sliced bell peppers, cucumber slices, broccoli florets and jicama “fries,” are often kid favorites and if they’re served with a dip, even better.

You can also set up a station with a variety of vegetables and have your kids make their own grilled veggie kabobs.

Although your kids may still not want to eat vegetables since other, tastier options will be available, do your best to get some on their plates since they’ll help to satisfy their hunger, fill them up, and prevent constipation.

3. Arrive hungry

Most nutrition experts advise people to have a small snack before they arrive at a party to prevent overeating, but arriving hungry may actually be a good thing for your kids.

By taking advantage of their hunger, you might have an easier time of encouraging them to make at least a few healthy choices.

Instead of filling up their plates with chips, which they’re probably going to eat anyway, you may be able to get them to eat fruits and vegetables first and have a more balanced meal.

4. Upgrade your protein

Most kids love hamburgers and hot dogs, but think about other protein options for you and them.

Instead of regular ‘ol hamburgers, make your own using grass fed beef. Or serve organic grilled chicken, shrimp or pull together a bean salad or lentil chili.

5. Include healthy dessert options

Kids should enjoy s’mores, ice cream or a festive Memorial Day dessert, but why not have other options available too to show kids that healthy food can be delicious.

Consider making a fruit salad with strawberries and blueberries, homemade fruit popsicles, or an almond butter fruit dip.

6. Pay attention to portions


When buffets, family style dining, and bowls of snacks are out for the day, it’s easy for kids to grab and lose sight of how much they’re eating.

Although I let my kids decide what they want to eat, I also help them make up their plate and keep portion sizes at bay.

7. Set up games and activities


There’s no doubt kids will be busy running and playing at their Memorial Day BBQ, but you can also set up games and activities that encourage them to move more. 

Think: ring toss, jump rope, hide and seek, tag, telephone or freeze dance.

What are some of your healthy Memorial Day BBQ ideas? Let me know in the comments!

5 Reasons Strawberries Are Healthy For Kids  The quintessential summer time fruit most kids love are super-healthy too.

5 Reasons Strawberries Are Healthy For Kids

The quintessential summer time fruit most kids love are super-healthy too.

There’s nothing better than the taste of fresh, sweet, succulent strawberries—the quintessential summer time fruit that most kids love.

In fact, 94 percent of U.S. households eat strawberries—nearly 5 pounds a year!

And 53 percent of young kids say strawberries are their favorite type of fruit.

The spring and summer months are prime time for picking strawberries, which is not only fun to do with your kids, but it can put an end to picky eating.

When it comes to choosing strawberries, organic is best since the Environmental Working Group (EWG)’s ranks them #1 on their Dirty Dozen list of fruits and vegetables highest in pesticides.

If organic isn’t within your budget however, the benefits of eating conventionally grown strawberries still outweigh the risks.

Here are 5 reasons strawberries are healthy for kids.

1. Strawberries are loaded with nutrition

Strawberries are one of the best superfoods you can feed your kids.

One cup of strawberries have nearly 150 percent of the daily value of vitamin C.

Strawberries are high in fiber and manganese, and a good source of potassium, calcium and magnesium.

Strawberries are also rich in antioxidants that have been shown to ward off certain types of cancer.

Studies show eating strawberries may reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke and hypertension.

2. Strawberries can prevent and treat constipation

Constipation is a common problems for kids. In fact, nearly 5 percent of pediatrician visits are because of constipation, according to a report in the Journal of Pediatric Health Care.

With 3 grams of fiber in every cup and a high water content, eating strawberries can help prevent constipation and get things moving again.

3. Strawberries might prevent type-2 diabetes

Rates of type-2 diabetes are on the rise in kids— a result in part, due to childhood obesity and diets high in processed foods.

Between 2008 and 2009, more than 5,000 kids were diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. Plus, and April 2017 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed the rate of newly diagnosed cases of type-2 diabetes in children between ages 10 and 19 increased by 4.8 percent.

Although kids should eat a wide variety of fruits to get the most nutrition, strawberries are healthy for kids because they have a low glycemic load—a measurement of a food’s impact on blood sugar.

In fact, a small study published in  February 2016 in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research found eating strawberries may improve insulin resistance and prevent type-2 diabetes.

4. Strawberries support healthy eyes

Strawberries are one of the best foods to support kids’ eye health.

Vitamin C is necessary for proper eye function and their antioxidants may prevent cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.

These are not concerns when kids are young of course, but teaching kids healthy eating habits now will set the stage for healthy eating in the future.

5. Strawberries encourage healthy eating

Kids love their sweets but before you dish out candy, cake or cookies, try serving strawberries.

Strawberries can satisfy a sweet tooth and make for a healthy, delicious swap for a high-sugar dessert, even if your kids refuse to eat dinner.

What’s more, if you can add strawberries to the list of foods your kid will eat, he may be more likely to try and love other new fruits too.

Do your kids love strawberries? What are your favorite ways to serve them? Let me know in the comments.